Booking

7 – 9 players

Carola Bauckholt: Ich muss mit Dir reden

Carola Bauckholt was born in Krefeld, Germany, in 1959. After working at the Theater am Marienplatz (TAM), Krefeld, for several years, she studied composition at the Musikhochschule Köln with Mauricio Kagel (1978-84). A central theme of Baukholt’s work is the examination of the phenomena of perception and understanding. Bauckholt often brings everyday noise into the concert hall. Extended intstrumental techniques are used to bring out her very special sound and an original expression, often containing visual elements.

Program:

Sog (2013) 18’

 

Laufwerk (2011) 12’

 

Keil (2000) 15’

 

Treibstoff (1995) 10’

Or:

Ohne worte zwei (2011) 10’

Lichtung (2011) 11’

Foto: Regine Körner

Eivind Buene: Possible Cities/Essential Landscapes

Part I: Possible Cities

Possible Cities (fragment)

Grid

Possible Cities

Part II: Essential Landscapes

Landscape with Ruins

Ultrabucolic Studies/ Night Music (I)/

Miniature Landscapes (II)

Molto Fluido

                                  

Nature Morte

tutti                 4'

string quartet       10'

tutti                15'

piano trio - tutti   15'

tutti                 5'

clarinet quartet      7'

tutti                11'

This chamber music cycle of approximately 70 mins is written on initiative from the Cikada Ensemble. Part I of the cycle is titled Possible Cities and part II Essential Landscapes. The titles, and much of the inspiration for the music, is from Italo Calvinos book Invisible Cities.

 

”I have always thought that moving through a city is a good metaphor for listening to new music. A big city will invite you through unfamiliar streets, into dark alleyways and sudden openings of light. It demands active participation, it offers new experiences, and there are countless ways of moving from one point to the next; a multitude of possible itineraries open up for both the wanderer and the listener. Traversing a city lets you meditate on construction and decay, on human ingenuity and the inevitable forces of time. Apparent chaos suddenly reveals a beautiful logic. Seemingly random patterns turn out to be networks of human interaction. And underneath the solid surfaces there's always nature, waiting to take over, to obliterate our structures with organic growth. I have tried to make these liminal states audible in Possible Cities/Essential Landscapes. The work is an invitation to listen into a landscape where stories emerge, multiply and disappear. As Italo Calvino phrases it in Invisible Cities: It is not the voice that commands the story: It is the ear.”

 

Eivind Buene, 2012.

 
 
Liza Lim and Lars Petter Hagen

Liza Lim: 

Philtre (1997)

Winding Bodies (2013-14)

The Heart's Ear (1997)

— — — 

Lars Petter Hagen: 

Funeral March for E. Grieg (2007)

Harmonium Repertoire (2016)        

Lisa Lim's creative thinking is shaped by the experience of ecstatic transformation and intercultural exploration often drawing draws its sources from the ritual music and aesthetics of aboriginal cultures in Australia and Asia.

 

Lim’s music ranges from operatic, chamber and orchestral scores to site-specific installations. She is Professor of Composition at the University of Huddersfield. Her work is published by Ricordi Berlin.

 

 

Lars Petter Hagen is a composer and curator. He is also a foodie and a melancholic, often in combination (as he was once quoted in Dagsavisen: "I go to restaurants alone when I need to unwind").

Lars Petter’s work ranges from large-scale symphonic pieces to intimate chamber music and sound installations, via works for stage and film. He lives and works in Oslo, Norway. 

 

 

Hardanger fiddle solo

 

fl, bass cl, pno, perc, hardanger, vln, vla, vlc, db

 

fl/picc, cl, 2 vln, vla, vlc

 

 

fl, cl, perc, pno, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db, el.acoustics

 

fl, cl, indian harmonium, perc, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db

 
Gérard Pesson

Program:

Cassation (2003)

La vita è come l'albero di Natale (1992)

Nebenstück (1998)

Cikada Commission                           

Or

Mes béatitudes (1995)

Vexierbilder II (2003)

Ne pas oublier coq rouge dans jour craquelé (moments Proust) (2010)

17’     clarinet, string trio and piano

 

2’      violin and piano

9’      clarinet and string quartet

 

30’     tutti 

                                          15'     piano, violin, viola and cello

   

13'     piano

11’     violin, cello and piano

Gérard Pesson on Nebenstück:

Filtering Ballade opus 10 n°4 by Johannes Brahms for clarinet and string quartet.

In transcribing a ballade by Brahms for two instruments, I have tried to fix objectively the strange contamination that exists between musical invention and memory. The works that haunt us often crop up when we think we have plucked an idea from nowhere, and as they spring back they colour our obsessions, for, in art, research is a concomitant of unceasing archaeology.

Ne pas oublier coq rouge dans jour craquelé (moments Proust) – do not forget the red cock in the cracked day – consists of several musical moments inspired by Marcel Proust’s sketch books. The work is a tribute to Vinteuil, a fictional composer figuring in À la recherche du temps perdu, but also a meditation over other mysteries in Proust. The phrase, and the work’s title, is some sort of memento that Proust wrote at the back of page 45 in volume 4 (1914–1917), and is linked both to a painting by Bruegel and the glowing septet of Vinteuil’s last opus. 

 
Night windows
– a portrait concert of Bent Sørensen and the Cikada Ensemble

Program:

The Hill of the Heartless Giant (2001)

The Lady of Shalott (1993) 

Vuggeviser (2000)

The Lady and the Lark (1997)

The Weeping White Room (2002)

The Songs of the Decaying Garden (1986/92)

The Deserted Churchyards (1990)

Funeral Processsion (1989)                       

double bass solo

string Quartet

piano solo

viola solo and fl, cla, perc, 2 vl, vlc

 

fl, cla, pno, perc, 2 vl, vla, vlc, cb

clarinet solo

        

fl, cla, pno, perc, vl,vlc

fl, cla, pno, perc, 2 vl, vla, vlc

The concert cycle Night Windows, which borrows its name from a painting by Edward Hopper, has been created by the composer in a unique, close collaboration with the nine musicians and the conductor of the Cikada ensemble. Night Windows now consists of eight pieces by Sørensen, played in one, continuous sequence without breaks, the complete cycle lasting for a little more than an hour. The scoring of the cycle oscillates between solo pieces, small chamber constellations and the full ensemble. This instrumental variation is also reflected in the fact that the spatial locations of the musicians on stage change for each piece. ”I sometimes think of a listener’s way through Night Windows  as linked to his moving through an exhibition”, Sørensen says. ”In one movement the music might pull him forward. Then a resonance of something that has been creates a possibility to change direction and have an experience of returning. My music very often is about how things are changed by time. Contained in this is also a sense of loss and decay”.

 
Gérard Pesson and Lars Petter Hagen

Program:

Gérard Pesson:


New piece (2017) 25’ TO BE WORLD PREMIERED SPRING 2018
fl, cl, perc, pno/celesta, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db

 

Lars Petter Hagen:
 

Harmonium Repertoire (2016) 20’
fl, cl, indian harmonium, perc, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db

 

Sørgemarsj over Edvard Grieg/ Funeral March for Edvard Grieg (2007) 10’
fl, cl, perc, pno, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db, electro acoustics

 

 

All works are commissioned by Cikada.                   

Gérard Pesson studied at the Sorbonne, where he obtained his doctorate with a thesis on The Aesthetics of Aleatoric Music. He also studied composition with Ivo Malec, orchestration with Marius Constant and analysis with Betsy Jolas at the Paris Conservatory. In 1986, he founded the contemporary music publication Entretemps and became a music producer at Radio France. Awarded the Toulouse Studium Prize in 1986, he also won the "Opéra autrement" competition in 1989 with Beau soir. From 1990 to 1992 he was resident at the Villa Médicis, home of the Académie de France inRome, and in 1996, he was awarded the Prince Pierre de Monaco Prize. Pesson’s works have been played by numerous ensembles and orchestras both in France and abroad.

 

Lars Petter Hagen is a composer and curator. He is also a foodie and a melancholic, often in combination (as he was once quoted in Dagsavisen: "I go to restaurants alone when I need to unwind").

Hagen’s works range from large-scale symphonic pieces to intimate chamber music and sound installations, via works for stage and film. He lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

 
 
James Dillon and Lars Petter Hagen

Program:


James Dillon:


Oslo Triptych (2010-11) 25’
fl, cl, pno, perc, 2 vln, vla, vlc

Lars Petter Hagen:
 

Harmonium Repertoire (2016) 20’
fl, cl, indian harmonium, perc, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db

 

Sørgemarsj over Edvard Grieg/ Funeral March for Edvard Grieg (2007) 10’
fl, cl, perc, pno, 2 vln, vla, vlc, db, electro acoustics
                   

James Dillon was invited to Oslo in 1989 by Oslo Sinfonietta. During his stay, he got to know some of the musicians in Cikada and they have stayed in touch since. Oslo Triptych is the second part of a musical triptych:


1: The Leuven Triptych (2008-9)
2: Oslo Triptych (2010-11)
3: New York Triptych (2011-12)

Lars Petter Hagen is a composer and curator. He is also a foodie and a melancholic, often in combination (as he was once quoted in Dagsavisen: "I go to restaurants alone when I need to unwind").

Hagen’s works range from large-scale symphonic pieces to intimate chamber music and sound installations, via works for stage and film. He lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

 
A concert with Cikada – Premiered at Donaueschingen

Program:


Agata Zubel

 

new piece 15-20'

tutti

 

Klaus Lang

 

new piece 15-20'

tutti

Rolf Wallin

 

new piece 30-35'

tutti                 

This program is commissioned for the Donaueschingen Festival 2018. Established in 1921, the Donaueschingen Festival is the world's oldest festival for New Music and the most renowned of its kind in Germany. The festival has hosted the world premieres of many famous composers of the 20th century, and has now commissioned three pieces for a Cikada concert from Agata Zubel, Klaus Lang and Rolf Wallin.

 

The pieces by Zubel and Lang are under production. Wallin`s piece is based on the same idea as his percussion concerto Das war schön! inspired by Mozart`s pet bird, Herr Stahr. His idea is to further explore the field of bird song by making an “aviary” of instrumental solos, using a different bird for each instrument. The solos could then, following specific rules, be put together in any combination: duos, trios, etc. Thus, the Cikada project would consist of 9 solos and a chamber ensemble piece.

World premiere – Jon Øivind Ness

John Øyvind Ness is writing a full-length piece for Cikada ensemble inspired by – and as a challenge to -  the relatively new genre “pop contemporary music”. This will be contemporary music with references to Tunes of two Cities, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts and films like Blade Runner and Fifth Element.

Ness himself describes his project thus:

 

“In my new piece for Cikada, I want to create ‘pop music’ from a completely different basis – from fictive cultures, from cultures that merge diverging musical styles, ‘future’s music’. The inspiration has been The Residents’ albums Eskimo and Tunes of two Cities as well as the sound tracks of Blade Runner, Fifth Element and Starship Troopers. On Tunes of two Cities we hear the music of two rivalling groups, where the apparently kind ones – with their lively cocktail jazz – turn out to be the bad ones, while the ugly and gloomy people living underground turn out to be sensitive and serious.

 

The ‘future’s music’ we hear in Blade Runner actually became a real genre today, a sort of electro-arab dance pop. In Fifth Element they tried inventing something new, that ended up sounding pretty tacky, while in Starship Troopers they didn’t even try, something I interpret as a humoristic statement.

 

I have talked to my colleague Lars Skoglund about making up a game where we put notes with names of musical genres in a hat, like country, heavy metal, chewing gum pop etc., and then pulling out two notes and combining the two genres. It’s silly, but I think it can be funny. As an example, Byrne/ Eno’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was, when it came out in 1981, almost without precedents in the combining of sampled speech with technological rhythms and ‘ethnic’ music. I think new combinations made in a creative and thorough way end up surpassing the combination itself. Kendrick Lamar’s integration of jazz in his hip hop, is so thorough and seamless that it’s neither jazz nor hip hop, but perhaps something completely new. I think this is a big and unexplored field.”

 

In this new work, Wallin will take pieces form his earlier works, break them down and reassemble them in new ways, just like a kaleidoscope, where new shapes are constantly made from the same elements. With this auditive kaleidoscope – or kaleidophone - Wallin will create an independent work with a durata of approximately one hour. 


Central in this experience is Large Bird Mask – an aviary for survival, a work that will be premiered at Donaueschingen Musiktage in 2018.

Kaleidofon – Rolf Wallin (approx. 60`)

From the program note of Large Bird Mask:

 

Scientists claim we are in the midst of the sixth global mass extermination of species. The dinosaurs were exterminated by a giant asteroid hit, this time we humans are the culprits. We are clearly a threat to our surroundings, even to ourselves, because of a strange attitude to our planet; we look at ourselves as conquerors, not as a part of a large, delicate dance. Maybe we wouldn't have been in this terrible situation if we, instead of what we praise as "rational farming and food industry", did as the hunters of many so-called "primitive" peoples do: Before one kills an animal, one asks for permission to kill it, and thanks it. Not only for being kind, but for appeasing the animal spirits, so that there will be animals to harvest also next year. 


In many cultures, awe-inspiring masks and costumes are worn by the shamans, enabling them to become one with that particular animal spirit. Instead of dancing and wearing masks, the musicians of Cikada Ensemble will use another strategy to "become birds": Their parts are developed from transcriptions of the song of endangered bird species. Rather than a normal concert situation, the audience enters an auditive, electronically produced forest. 

               

 

Sentralen, Postboks 183 Sentrum, 0102 Oslo

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